Please Wait...

How many casualties resulted from the South African War?

boer war

Summary
British: 22 390
British Deaths: Total 21 882 (1 072 Officers; 20 810 men). Killed: 7 792; Died of Disease: 13 250.
Sent Home as Invalids: Total 75 530 (3 116 Officers; 72 314 men). Subsequently died: 508
Scale: British forces grew to 450 000 at the height of hostilities.
Unknown number of local Black forces – estimates of up to 100 000 (deaths unknown).
Boers: 33 927 Whites plus more than 20 000 Blacks
Boer Combatant Deaths: 6 000 (estimated).
Boer civilian deaths in concentration camps: 27 927 Whites; 14 154 Blacks (official figure – 20 000 + estimated).
Scale: Potential of 54 000 men but never more than 40 000 were employed at once.

Detail
In the course of the South African War, British losses totaled about 28,000 men. Afrikaner losses were about 4,000 men, plus more than 26,000 civilians who died from disease in concentration camps.
(http://www.tourismnorthwest.co.za/history/anglo_boer_war.html)

In all 22,000 British died but the Boer losses were about 4,000. The innocent were the losers, they suffered most, with 20,000 Boer civilians dying from disease in the concentration camps as well as thousands of unaccountable black Africans in the same camps.
(Source: http://www.roll-of-honour.com/Regiments/BoerWarOverview.html)

22,000 British troops had died and over 25,000 Boer civilians.
(Source: http://www.boer-war.com/)

Total BRITISH deaths in South Africa October 1899 - May 1902:

Officers 1072, Men 20810, Total British Dead 21882.

Besides the soldiers who actually died there were vast casualties, including:
Prisoners and Missing   105
Sent home as invalids:
3116 Officers (8 Died),
72314 men (500 Died, 5879 Discharged as unfit for further service)
Of 72314 men; Wounded 8221, Sick 63644, Not specified 449Total BRITISH casualties in South Africa October 1899 - May 1902:
Officers 4188 Men 93229,

TOTAL 97417
(Source: http://www.rfc-rnas-raf-register.org.uk/Boer%20War%20Casualties.htm)

Boer Casualties:
Of the 28,000 Boer men captured as prisoners of war, 25,630 were sent overseas.
A report after the war concluded that 27,927 Boers (of whom 24,074 [50% of the Boer child population] were children under 16) and 14,154 black Africans had died of starvation, disease and exposure in the concentration camps. In all, about one in four (25%) of the Boer inmates, mostly children, died.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Boer_War#The_concentration_camps
Some 26,000 “Boer” women and children and 14,000 black and colored people were to die in appalling conditions.
(Source: http://www.south-africa-tours-and-travel.com/boer-war.html)
The scope of the war was the biggest thus far on South African territory and one of the greatest thus far waged by Britain in Southern Africa. The Boer forces had a potential of 54 000 men but never more than 40 000 were empIoyed at once, whilst the British forces grew to 450 000 at the height of hostilities. Casualties were as follows:
British soldiers: 7 792 (killed) 13 250 (deaths from disease)
Boers: 6 000
Women and children in Concentration Camps: 26 370
Blacks in Concentration Camps: 20 000+ (Official British figure: 14 154)
(Source: http://www.icon.co.za/%7Edup42/abw.htm)

About the same time and supporting Milner's viewpoint, the Fawcett Commission report, December 1901, stated:
"to turn 100,000 people now being held in the concentration camps out on the veldt to take care of themselves would be cruelty . . ."
(Source: http://www-sul.stanford.edu/depts/ssrg/africa/boers.html)
http://www.greeff.info/tng01/angloboerwar.php